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Smoking: From a Dental Perspective

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It is a relatively known fact that smoking is not the best for your overall health. Most of the time people’s first thought about the damaging effects of smoking is lung cancer or other lung diseases. The truth is it can be the source of many more bodily problems. This includes multiple effects on oral health.

 

Let’s take a look at why you should either never start smoking or quit smoking if you want to have a healthy smile!

Oral Cancer

In over two-thirds of all oral cancer cases, tobacco usage played a major role. With the mouth in close proximity to many of the body’s most important arteries, oral cancer can spread to the rest of the body fairly easily. It often forms on the bottom of the mouth, along with the side of the tongue, or back of the throat but can simply form anywhere in the mouth.

Periodontal/Gum Disease

Nobody wants to lose their teeth. Unfortunately for smokers, the risk of periodontal/gum disease rises because of the increase of tartar around the teeth. Combined with slowed healing in the mouth, the effects can lead to losing your teeth. Yes, cavities can lead to losing teeth but statistically speaking, smoking causes loss of teeth more often than just cavities.

Decreased Healing After Oral Surgery

Smoking impacts the immune system and can affect the healing process post mouth surgery. After having teeth pulled, smokers have an increased risk of dry sockets because it takes longer for them to completely heal compared to a nonsmoker. The same is true for healing time and success with any other surgery including implant placement and surgery removing gum disease.

Stained Teeth and Tongue

It is obvious to point out a smoker from a group when everybody is smiling together. Smoking stains the teeth and tongue even if they brush twice a day, every day. Teeth will pick up a darkish brown while tongues can have a white or brown stain that is extremely difficult removed.

Bad Breath

Smoking brings a harsh smell to some noses. Even long after the smoke break, smoking makes it easier for bacteria to grow inside the mouth which then leads to bad breath.

Hopefully, after reading this blog, you will think twice before you light up a cigarette. We just want you to have a big, bright, healthy smile!